GDPR: 33% of UK consumers will erase personal data from insurance companies

GDPR rules mean nearly half of UK adults plan to exercise their new data rights over insurance companies.

GDPR: 33% of UK consumers will erase personal data from insurance companies

With the deadline for GDPR implementation due on 25 May 2018, a survey by software provider SAS has found that nearly half of UK adults plan to exercise their new data rights over insurance companies.

The study reveals:

  • 33% will exercise the right to have their data removed from insurance companies
  • 32% will ask insurance companies to stop using their data for marketing purposes
  • 32% will challenge automated decisions made by insurance companies
  • 29% will access the data that insurance companies hold about them

The 45- to 54-year-old age group is most likely to issue a request; with just over one in five (21 per cent) thinking they will active their new rights in the first month.

The propensity to submit a request drops to 13 per cent in the 18- to 24-year-old age category.

Regional variations

There are regional variations, with adults in the North East and South East more inclined to submit a request within the first month (18 per cent). This drops to 12 per cent in Wales, 11 per cent in the East of England and just 7 per cent in Northern Ireland.

 

Rights adults welcome

The poll revealed which rights UK adults would welcome most:

  • 64 per cent welcomed ‘the right to access’ (e.g. get a copy of personal data held about them)
  • 62 per cent welcomed ‘the right to erasure’ (e.g. erase personal data from certain systems)
  • 59 per cent welcomed ‘the right to rectification’ (e.g. if personal data is inaccurate or incomplete)
  • 56 per cent welcomed ‘the right to object’ (e.g. using data for marketing and profiling)
  • 54 per cent welcomed ‘the right to restrict processing’ (e.g. if they contest accuracy of data)
  • 43 per cent welcomed ‘rights in relation to automated decision making and profiling’ (e.g. the right to seek human intervention following an automated decision they disagree with)
  • 38 per cent welcomed ‘the right to data portability’ (e.g. obtaining and re-using data)